We chose the houseboat, with a party of friends. That evening the Chinese cook was given a very elaborate list of the necessaries of life and authorized to get an assistant. The next day at noon the houseboat was swept and garnished and stocked with provisions, and the two "Celestials" stood ready for their terrestrial charges. The steamer "Nelson" took us up the Kootenay River to Five-Mile Point, or Six-Mile Creek, where we anchored for the night. While "Fung" and "Wang" were getting dinner ready, some of our party strolled over the pebbly beach, while others put out in a row boat to cast a line for fish. Still others reclined under the canopy over the roof of the houseboat, gazing at the evening light upon the waters and waiting, with such Christian resignation as could be mustered, till the pig-tail of Wang should appear at the head of the stairs as a signal that dinner was served.

The next morning the "Moyie" on her regular trip to Kootenay Landing, called for us and the houseboat was lashed to her side for a further voyage. At Balfour we enter the Lakes. A magnificent scene is spread out before us. In front majestic mountains seem to rise out of the shining expanse of waters. On the left stretches of the Upper Lake and on the right the Lower. We are at the meeting place of many of nature's most beautiful feature. The fairest that may be seen in river, lake and hill mingle together here, while over all the bluest of August skies is bending. The sunbeams break into glittering fragments on the tiny waves and turn to dazzling whiteness the patches of snow that fleck the distant peaks. Exclamations of wonder break from all lips, and then we relapse into silence, hopelessly dumb before the entrancing picture.


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