Combination Baggage-Dormitory # 4489 (arrived 1986)

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  Work Done on the # 4489 After its Arrival  
     
 

Because it had such high visibility at Expo'86, exterior work began on the car while it was there on display. The first work included patching the holes in the steel with fibreglass. Next, the car was lightly sanded and a primed. A coat of traditional Tuscan Red enamel was applied, then the car was lettered in gold Mylar. The baggage area was also insulated with rigid insulation and covered with 3/4 ply with an exhibition surface. These additions were carefully attached for easy removal in the future allowing an option for the car to be returned to its baggage function as a display.

 

 
 

In 1987, the car went through a major interior restoration of its original paneled rooms. All veneers were stripped of the deteriorated and darkened varnishes, and this brought to light the subtle quarter-sawn Honduran mahogany grains. The door to the baggage area was left as found so that the comparison could be made.

All removable items were sent to a temporary workshop set up by the museum where they were coded and placed in a restoration schedule. In 6 months these pieces were re-installed along the in-situ panels which had been restored in the car.

   

The 4489 before and after restoration


     

Since air flow (for quality environmental control such as cooling, heating, and filtering, etc.) is essential in all restored cars, the ventilation designs for this car followed a format used in most, but not all, cars. The main ceiling was reduced about 3 inches and the full 4-foot width of was filled with a thin air vent about 4 inches deep, and curved to match the original ceiling. This design also allowed air to be routed through the original vents in the curved ceiling of the mens room without altering it in any way. This was a necessary compromise because the cars were to remain outside indefinitely until a building to enclose the cars could be constructed. This ventilation extended through the baggage/display area as well. A new electrical system was installed, and all lights were re-wired while the structure was exposed. New insulation was installed throughout as a further efficiency measure.

One end of the baggage area became a temporary theatre (seating 20) while the balance became an interpretive display area for the Trans-Canada Limited. All first class tours leave from this central area.

 

Since air flow (for quality environmental control such as cooling, heating, and filtering, etc.) is essential in all restored cars, the ventilation designs for this car followed a format used in most, but not all, cars. The main ceiling was reduced about 3 inches and the full 4-foot width of was filled with a thin air vent about 4 inches deep, and curved to match the original ceiling. This design also allowed air to be routed through the original vents in the curved ceiling of the mens room without altering it in any way. This was a necessary compromise because the cars were to remain outside indefinitely until a building to enclose the cars could be constructed. This ventilation extended through the baggage/display area as well. A new electrical system was installed, and all lights were re-wired while the structure was exposed. New insulation was installed throughout as a further efficiency measure.

One end of the baggage area became a temporary theatre (seating 20) while the balance became an interpretive display area for the Trans-Canada Limited. All first class tours leave from this central area.

 
 
Work Yet to do on the # 4489 (as of 1999)
 
All 12 seats in the main room and the sofa in the smoking room must be replaced with green calfskin leather. To date some have old leather and some have matching vinyl. The floor linoleum also needs repair. Future work will also see most of the baggage area returned to a baggage interpretive display, but this will wait until the museum has relocated to the new site, and the Trans-Canada Limited put in one line up with its cars in the correct sequence.
 

Notes on the # 4489

The # 4489 was used in the "Pilot Train" for the 1939 "Royal Train" tour. It is the only surviving car of its type.

 

Day-Parlour Car # 6751